Jump to content


Photo

Linux Apps


  • Please log in to reply
35 replies to this topic

#16 Vorporeal

Vorporeal

    Yes, no, I, this is.

  • GP32 Hardcore
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1475 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 12 December 2009 - 05:12 AM


Chromium is the open-source bit, it should be ported easily enough.
However, I actually moved back to Firefox.
Firefox 3.5 isn't as fast as Chrome, but it fixed the problems that 3.0 had for me, and it has all my adblock extensions and opens tabs the way I like and doesn't randomly fail to load a page.

Yeah, I was reading that their Chrome ad-block equivalent doesn't work, and why should it, Google makes all it's money off of ads. This is the reason that I'll never use it, I see ads in print, on TV, hear it on the radio, see bill boards along the road, I can't go to a public place without ads being in my face, but using the internet with Firefox that has the ad-block extension at least I can have some peace.


Chrome doesn't have an ad blocker, just a pop-up blocker. The new Chrome beta has extension support, and a few ad blocking extensions have been released.

#17 second exodous

second exodous

    Mega GP Mania

  • GP32 Hardcore
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1525 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Utah, USA
  • Interests:Linux
    Retro Gaming

Posted 12 December 2009 - 05:30 AM



Chromium is the open-source bit, it should be ported easily enough.
However, I actually moved back to Firefox.
Firefox 3.5 isn't as fast as Chrome, but it fixed the problems that 3.0 had for me, and it has all my adblock extensions and opens tabs the way I like and doesn't randomly fail to load a page.

Yeah, I was reading that their Chrome ad-block equivalent doesn't work, and why should it, Google makes all it's money off of ads. This is the reason that I'll never use it, I see ads in print, on TV, hear it on the radio, see bill boards along the road, I can't go to a public place without ads being in my face, but using the internet with Firefox that has the ad-block extension at least I can have some peace.


Chrome doesn't have an ad blocker, just a pop-up blocker. The new Chrome beta has extension support, and a few ad blocking extensions have been released.

Yeah, I read that they don't work though, that's what I'm saying. Here is the link.

But Adblocking has to be as good as it is on Firefox before I switch. Speed really means nothing to me, I could care less how fast it starts up because I open it once every time I turn my computer on. Rendering speed also doesn't mean much to me because it's only a fraction of a second between the fastest and slowest browsers anyway.

I also use lots of other plug-ins that Chrome would have to have.

#18 kwartel

kwartel

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 7 posts

Posted 12 December 2009 - 01:34 PM

It's getting off-topic

Thanks for the info.
From what I get:
It's possible, but only if they for arm an those are rare. When they are for x84 and open-source, you should just recompile it and test it. It MAYBE works. If not a more drastic form of porting needs to be applied.

Please comfirm if this is right.

(Sorry if my English is bad)

#19 mali

mali

    -

  • GP32 Hardcore
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6308 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:EU

Posted 12 December 2009 - 01:41 PM

You could use this as a starting point:
http://www.angstrom-distribution.org/
as the Pandora runs Angström.
When you click on "Package Browser" you'll find what will have the highest chance to run.

#20 dflemstr

dflemstr

    It's a ball.

  • GP32 Hardcore
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2249 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Stockholm, Sweden

Posted 12 December 2009 - 01:58 PM

Yeah, I read that they don't work though, that's what I'm saying. Here is the link.

But Adblocking has to be as good as it is on Firefox before I switch. Speed really means nothing to me, I could care less how fast it starts up because I open it once every time I turn my computer on. Rendering speed also doesn't mean much to me because it's only a fraction of a second between the fastest and slowest browsers anyway.

I also use lots of other plug-ins that Chrome would have to have.

Well, there's AdBlock+ for Chrome, it just hasn't been uploaded into the standard extension repository yet, because it's pretty beta.
You can still install it from here:
http://www.chromeext...ioning/adblock/

(And Google isn't like Firefox who say "You have to upload an extension to the central repository in order to get updates etc etc". Google allows 3rd party sites to host extensions with the same rights as themselves)

Oh and rendering speed *does* make a difference. You don't notice it until you get used to it, but it's really nice with the page moving *at the same time* as you move the friggin scroll bar and all. And it's not only the rendering speed; the whole engine is much faster as well (just look on PeaceKeeper or something)

I'd say at least try it for a while. You'll notice, as I did, that most extensions you currently depend on actually just are in your way, and that there are much more efficient ways of browsing with the features of Chromium/Chrome.

#21 kwartel

kwartel

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 7 posts

Posted 12 December 2009 - 02:05 PM

You could use this as a starting point:
http://www.angstrom-distribution.org/
as the Pandora runs Angström.
When you click on "Package Browser" you'll find what will have the highest chance to run.

sorry for being a pain in the ass, butdoes the pandora runs almost everything there or only the things under "Opie" and "x11"

BTW, can a mod split this topic in a linux and a Crome topic?

Edited by kwartel, 12 December 2009 - 02:06 PM.


#22 cosurgi

cosurgi

    http://janek.kozicki.pl/

  • GP32 Hardcore
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 681 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Gdansk, Poland

Posted 12 December 2009 - 02:05 PM

On debian installing linux apps is extremely easy:

aptitude install firefox

Or, if you need to port something from x86 to ARM then you simply do:

apt-get source firefox
apt-get build-dep firefox
debian/rules binary
dpkg -i firefox.deb

I'm sure that porting stuff from x86 to ARM on Angstrom is similarly easy, I just don't know the exact syntax, and that's why I'll install debian on Pandora. I'm too lazy to learn new syntax :)

#23 second exodous

second exodous

    Mega GP Mania

  • GP32 Hardcore
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1525 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Utah, USA
  • Interests:Linux
    Retro Gaming

Posted 12 December 2009 - 09:51 PM

Ångström uses the opkg package management system, but this mimics the apt-get from Debian distros, so everything is pretty much the same. Instead of going:
aptitude install firefox
You would use:
opkg install firefox
Just about the same thing. Also if whatever program you're installing has dependencies you don't have on your system then the opkg package management system handles all that also. So it's really easy to install things in Linux now, it's not like in the day when you had to compile everything your self, package managers do that for you.

Maybe someone in this community could make a graphical front end of the opkg package manager for the Pandora? There are a few but they look out dated.

#24 kwartel

kwartel

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 7 posts

Posted 13 December 2009 - 11:39 AM


You could use this as a starting point:
http://www.angstrom-distribution.org/
as the Pandora runs Angström.
When you click on "Package Browser" you'll find what will have the highest chance to run.

sorry for being a pain in the ass, butdoes the pandora runs almost everything there or only the things under "Opie" and "x11"

BTW, can a mod split this topic in a linux and a Crome topic?


can someone awnser me... I know I'm a noob and I sometimes flame them on other forums (Search you frickin noob), but I really searched and the whole run linux apps part is the only thing I want to learn.

BTW stop talking about chrome, firefox FTW

Edited by kwartel, 13 December 2009 - 11:41 AM.


#25 mali

mali

    -

  • GP32 Hardcore
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6308 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:EU

Posted 13 December 2009 - 11:59 AM

kwartel, I would help if I could, but I'm no Linux expert, in fact I'm a n00b, too.
Just ignore the off topic stuff, forum members are used to this behaviour, in fact some of the most productive discussions evolved out of it ;)

#26 dflemstr

dflemstr

    It's a ball.

  • GP32 Hardcore
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2249 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Stockholm, Sweden

Posted 13 December 2009 - 12:38 PM



You could use this as a starting point:
http://www.angstrom-distribution.org/
as the Pandora runs Angström.
When you click on "Package Browser" you'll find what will have the highest chance to run.

sorry for being a pain in the ass, butdoes the pandora runs almost everything there or only the things under "Opie" and "x11"

BTW, can a mod split this topic in a linux and a Crome topic?


can someone awnser me... I know I'm a noob and I sometimes flame them on other forums (Search you frickin noob), but I really searched and the whole run linux apps part is the only thing I want to learn.

BTW stop talking about chrome, firefox FTW

Yes, almost everything in the package browser will be available on the Pandora. You can look at an individual package, and if you find the architecture "armv7a" (I think that the Pandora is compatible with this) listed in there, it should run.

#27 hobbyman II

hobbyman II

    GP Mania

  • GP32 Hardcore
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 471 posts

Posted 13 December 2009 - 01:17 PM

your question was answered, I assume you don`t understand the ARM?/Linux scene, it's tricky for a new user to understand the differences/ similarities

simple answer, yes!

slightly longer answer, as long as the application has been compiled for Pandora or ARM, yes!

longer answer, most applications (nearly all) for Linux are open source, this makes it relatively simple to compile them for different cpu chips, so as long as the application has been compiled for Pandora or ARM, yes!

long winded simplified answer

Linux on your laptop or desktop PC runs programs written with special instructions for the "brain" inside it, in almost all laptops and desktops this "brain" is called an "x86 architecture cpu", this applies to all devices with Intel/AMD or whatever "brains".

so all the devices you normally use have "brains" that understand a unique set of instructions, these instructions are seen by the "brain" as numbers, all these numbers mean just one thing to that type of "brain", for example "23" may mean "add the next number to the one after it", a huge list of these instruction numbers is what a program IS internally.

to make things easy for us mere mortals, and to save us having to memorise several hundred numbers and what they mean, we have programs that take English-like instructions (for example "print"), and the program then converts "print" into a string of numbers that instruct the "brain" to copy data to the screen so that we see it (printing it), this is what a compiler does.

the Pandora has a "ARM" "brain", this has a different set of instruction numbers to the "x86 brain", so the ARM "brain" may use the "23" mentioned above to mean "copy the number you have in your memory to the memory location pointed to by the following number"

obviously, since the instructions do different things then an x86 program will be garbage to an ARM "brain" and crash or do something evil to the system or whatever.

now Linux programs are mostly open source, that means that the "English" instructions are published openly on the web and you are basically free to copy and use them, so if you have a compiler that can output ARM instructions, then you can put these "English" instructions into the compiler and get a ARM program out of it.

what does this mean for the Pandora?

we can take any open source program in "English" and stick it into a compiler for the Pandora, and we get a working version back that will run on the Pandora, obviously, if the program uses some device or memory the Pandora doesn't have then you need to alter the "English" instructions, so that the program will use less memory or just use the instructions recognised by the Pandoras more compact 3d chip, for example.

people will take popular Linux programs, recompile and modify them for Pandora (1024x768 fullscreen wouldn`t work too well for eg), then release them in a .pnd package for people to install, as these programs are released they will appear on the app store, archives and developer websites, then you just pick what you want and copy it to your SD card, that's it, installed.

some people may not use the .pnd container for their programs, some programs may not be modified to work well with Pandora and scatter themselves across the file system, but they will almost all have some kind of installer, Pandora may also have some kind of GUI package manager, so all you need to do, is look at a list on your Pandora, select a game/application, and click install, then Pandora just downloads it from the repository, and away you go.

hope that explains it somewhat, seems a bit in depth, but like all simple questions, it doesn`t have a simple answer.

#28 kwartel

kwartel

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 7 posts

Posted 13 December 2009 - 05:05 PM

your question was answered, I assume you don`t understand the ARM?/Linux scene, it's tricky for a new user to understand the differences/ similarities

simple answer, yes!

slightly longer answer, as long as the application has been compiled for Pandora or ARM, yes!

longer answer, most applications (nearly all) for Linux are open source, this makes it relatively simple to compile them for different cpu chips, so as long as the application has been compiled for Pandora or ARM, yes!

long winded simplified answer

Linux on your laptop or desktop PC runs programs written with special instructions for the "brain" inside it, in almost all laptops and desktops this "brain" is called an "x86 architecture cpu", this applies to all devices with Intel/AMD or whatever "brains".

so all the devices you normally use have "brains" that understand a unique set of instructions, these instructions are seen by the "brain" as numbers, all these numbers mean just one thing to that type of "brain", for example "23" may mean "add the next number to the one after it", a huge list of these instruction numbers is what a program IS internally.

to make things easy for us mere mortals, and to save us having to memorise several hundred numbers and what they mean, we have programs that take English-like instructions (for example "print"), and the program then converts "print" into a string of numbers that instruct the "brain" to copy data to the screen so that we see it (printing it), this is what a compiler does.

the Pandora has a "ARM" "brain", this has a different set of instruction numbers to the "x86 brain", so the ARM "brain" may use the "23" mentioned above to mean "copy the number you have in your memory to the memory location pointed to by the following number"

obviously, since the instructions do different things then an x86 program will be garbage to an ARM "brain" and crash or do something evil to the system or whatever.

now Linux programs are mostly open source, that means that the "English" instructions are published openly on the web and you are basically free to copy and use them, so if you have a compiler that can output ARM instructions, then you can put these "English" instructions into the compiler and get a ARM program out of it.

what does this mean for the Pandora?

we can take any open source program in "English" and stick it into a compiler for the Pandora, and we get a working version back that will run on the Pandora, obviously, if the program uses some device or memory the Pandora doesn't have then you need to alter the "English" instructions, so that the program will use less memory or just use the instructions recognised by the Pandoras more compact 3d chip, for example.

people will take popular Linux programs, recompile and modify them for Pandora (1024x768 fullscreen wouldn`t work too well for eg), then release them in a .pnd package for people to install, as these programs are released they will appear on the app store, archives and developer websites, then you just pick what you want and copy it to your SD card, that's it, installed.

some people may not use the .pnd container for their programs, some programs may not be modified to work well with Pandora and scatter themselves across the file system, but they will almost all have some kind of installer, Pandora may also have some kind of GUI package manager, so all you need to do, is look at a list on your Pandora, select a game/application, and click install, then Pandora just downloads it from the repository, and away you go.

hope that explains it somewhat, seems a bit in depth, but like all simple questions, it doesn`t have a simple answer.

thank you, this should be pinned! I wil quote this in the first topic! The perfect noob explanation!

#29 emcp

emcp

    GP Mania

  • GP32 Hardcore
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 341 posts

Posted 14 December 2009 - 11:55 PM

Don't use Google Chrome, they don't respect your privacy: http://www.theregist...idt_on_privacy/


Sorry to jump on the chrome train again but

really do you really care that much
Providing the dont hand out my contact details i dont care what they do with the data they collect
i hope the use it to optimise there products

i just dont know why people are sooo concerned about their privacy, its not going to have any negative affects

also i dont mind google ads, infact i encourage them, they arnt as pain in the ass as the others

also google doest have much control other ad-blockers on chrome, not much more than they have on a firefox plugin

Ive got ad sweep and it seems to do the job fine, plus you dont need a beta release for it
although one of the sites i recently visit, have change there layout and adsweep removes article preview pictures
and theres no easy way to tell it to stop it, but this is because its not a full fledged plugin

also firefox started to act up on me, hence why i swicthed
i also like the clean look

i found myself installing lots of plugins in firefox which i never really used, chrome does me fine

#30 second exodous

second exodous

    Mega GP Mania

  • GP32 Hardcore
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1525 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Utah, USA
  • Interests:Linux
    Retro Gaming

Posted 15 December 2009 - 12:07 AM


Don't use Google Chrome, they don't respect your privacy: http://www.theregist...idt_on_privacy/


Sorry to jump on the chrome train again but

really do you really care that much
Providing the dont hand out my contact details i dont care what they do with the data they collect
i hope the use it to optimise there products

i just dont know why people are sooo concerned about their privacy, its not going to have any negative affects

I don't know, I think it's justified to worry about what Google is collecting. One small step and they could become data partners with anyone. Imagine if they gave your information to a dictator with a party like the Nazi party or something, extreme example I know but I don't want them to know everything about me.

I think their policy will eventually change though. Isn't their company policy 'don't be evil' or something like that?

Edited by second exodous, 15 December 2009 - 12:07 AM.